Workplace discrimination

July 30, 2019 - 2:56 pm
BLOOMFIELD, Conn. (AP) — The slaughter in a Home Depot parking lot of a calf that escaped a butcher shop and led employees on a chase has sparked outrage from animal lovers and elicited racist messages online. The calf broke out of the Saba Live Poultry shop in Connecticut on July 13 and ran behind...
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In this July 29, 2019, photo, President Donald Trump speaks before signing H.R. 1327, an act ensuring that a victims' compensation fund related to the Sept. 11 attacks never runs out of money, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
July 30, 2019 - 9:23 am
BROOKFIELD, Wis. (AP) — Carol Evans approves of Donald Trump's immigration policy. She gives him credit for the strong economy. But the Republican from the affluent Milwaukee suburbs of Waukesha County, a GOP bedrock in the state, just can't commit to voting for the president next year like she did...
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FILE - This Sept. 16, 2013, file photo shows the ESPN logo prior to an NFL football game between the Cincinnati Bengals and the Pittsburgh Steelers, in Cincinnati. ESPN is reminding employees of the network's policy to avoid talking about politics after radio talk show host Dan Le Batard criticized President Donald Trump and his recent racist comments and ESPN itself on the air this week. (AP Photo/David Kohl, File)
July 21, 2019 - 5:40 am
NEW YORK (AP) — ESPN is reminding employees of the network's policy to avoid talking about politics after radio talk show host Dan Le Batard criticized President Donald Trump and his recent racist comments and ESPN itself on the air this week. The reminder went out Friday to all employees,...
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FILE - This Tuesday, July 16, 2019 image from video provided by WSET-TV shows a sign for the Friendship Baptist Church which reads, "America: Love it or Leave It" in Appomattox, Va. Amid a national furor over President Donald Trump’s tweet urging four Democratic congresswomen to “go back” to their home countries, Pastor E. W. Lucas is gaining attention with the sign at his church. (WSET-TV via AP)
July 20, 2019 - 9:12 am
NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump's suggestion that four activist Democratic congresswomen of color "go back" to countries "from which they came" has excited some in his political base. Yet in many of America's workplaces and institutions, the same language would be unacceptable and possibly...
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From left, Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and Rep. Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., respond to remarks by President Donald Trump after his call for the four Democratic congresswomen to go back to their "broken" countries, during a news conference at the Capitol in Washington, Monday, July 15, 2019. All are American citizens and three of the four were born in the U.S. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
July 19, 2019 - 9:21 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Long before President Donald Trump turned up the heat on four Democratic congresswomen of color, saying they should "go back" to their home countries, hateful rhetoric and disinformation about the self-described squad was lurking online. Racist, inflammatory and inaccurate content...
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FILE - In this June 12, 2000 file photo Country music fans are reflected in the glasses of Southern rock group Confederate Railroad lead singer Danny Shirley during a concert in Nashville, Tenn. Confederate Railroad says it has been removed from the DuQuoin State Fair's Grandstand lineup because of its name. Frontman Danny Shirley said in a statement Tuesday, June 9, 2019 that the band is disappointed but thanked fans for their support. The group was scheduled to play Aug. 27, 2019. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
July 10, 2019 - 1:02 pm
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — Country rock band Confederate Railroad has been barred from performing at an Illinois state fair because of its use of the Confederate flag, setting off a firestorm by southern Illinois fans who believe they're under Chicago liberals' thumb of political correctness. The...
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Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaks at his official residence after announcing his government not to appeal against damages ruling in leprosy suit, in Tokyo Tuesday, July 9, 2019. Japan says it will not challenge the recent court ruling awarding damages to former leprosy patients' families for their suffering from discrimination caused by the government's failure to end its isolation policy. (Yohei Kanasashi/Kyodo News via AP)
July 09, 2019 - 9:10 am
TOKYO (AP) — Japan's prime minister said Tuesday that the government will abide by a court ruling ordering it to compensate former leprosy patients' families over a lengthy segregation policy that severed family ties and caused long-lasting prejudice. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said the government...
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Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks at a campaign event Tuesday, July 2, 2019, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
July 05, 2019 - 12:34 pm
Democratic 2020 hopeful Elizabeth Warren says that if elected president she would sign executive orders aimed at addressing the wage and employment leadership gap for women of color, punishing companies and contractors with historically poor records on diversity and equality by denying them...
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Shana Bonner, left, styles the hair of Pho Gibson at Exquisite U hair salon in Sacramento, Calif., Wednesday, July 3, 2019. Gov. Gavin Newsom signed into law Wednesday a bill making California the first state to ban workplace and school discrimination against black people for wearing hairstyles such as braids, twists and locks. (AP Photo/Kathleen Ronayne)
July 04, 2019 - 1:37 am
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Gov. Gavin Newsom signed into law Wednesday a bill making California the first state to ban workplace and school discrimination against black people for wearing hairstyles such as braids, twists and locks. The law by Democratic Sen. Holly Mitchell of Los Angeles, a black...
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FILE - This Oct. 4, 2018, file photo shows the U.S. Supreme Court at sunset in Washington. More than 200 corporations have signed a friend-of-the-court brief urging the U.S. Supreme Court to rule that federal civil rights law bans job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. The brief, announced Tuesday, July 2, 2019 by a coalition of five LGBTQ-rights groups, is being submitted to the Supreme Court this week ahead of oral arguments before the justices this fall on three cases that may determine whether gays, lesbians and transgender people are protected from discrimination by existing federal civil rights laws. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
July 02, 2019 - 12:46 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — More than 200 corporations, including many of America's best-known companies, are urging the U.S. Supreme Court to rule that federal civil rights law bans job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. The corporations outlined their stance in a legal...
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