Virology

Passengers wearing protective face masks enter the departure hall of a high speed train station in Hong Kong, Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020. China closed off a city of more than 11 million people Thursday, halting transportation and warning against public gatherings, to try to stop the spread of a deadly new virus that has sickened hundreds and spread to other cities and countries in the Lunar New Year travel rush. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
SKY News
January 23, 2020 - 7:56 pm
BEIJING (AP) — China moved to lock down at least three cities with a combined population of more than 18 million in an unprecedented effort to contain the deadly new virus that has sickened hundreds of people and spread to other parts of the world during the busy Lunar New Year holiday. The open-...
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September 08, 2019 - 11:08 pm
BOSTON (AP) — U.S. Sens. Edward Markey and Elizabeth Warren are pressing federal health officials on research efforts to combat eastern equine encephalitis. The two Massachusetts Democrats this week sent a letter to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases within the National...
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In this May 8, 2019, photo, pigs eat feed at a pig farm in Panggezhuang village in northern China's Hebei province. As a deadly virus ravages pig herds across Asia, scientists are accelerating efforts to develop a vaccine to help guard the world's pork supply. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
August 21, 2019 - 12:20 am
BEIJING (AP) — Scientists are working to develop a vaccine to help guard the world's pork supply as a deadly virus ravages Asia's pig herds. Farmers have long contained its spread by quarantining and killing infected animals, but the disease's devastating march into East Asia is intensifying the...
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Braden Scott gives a thumbs up as he pauses while practicing on the piano in Tomball, Texas on Friday, March 29, 2019. Braden was diagnosed with the mysterious syndrome called acute flaccid myelitis, or AFM, in 2016 and was paralyzed almost completely. But since then he has recovered much of his muscle function. His parents believe a lot of it has to do with thousands of hours of physical therapy. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
April 02, 2019 - 5:14 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — One morning last fall, 4-year-old Joey Wilcox woke up with the left side of his face drooping. It was the first sign of an unfolding nightmare. Three days later, Joey was in a hospital intensive care unit, unable to move his arms or legs or sit up. Spinal taps and other tests failed...
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FILE - In this Aug. 8, 2018, file photo, a healthcare worker from the World Health Organization gives an Ebola vaccination to a front line aid worker in Mangina, Democratic Republic of Congo. One-fourth of the people interviewed in eastern Congo last year believed Ebola wasn't real, according to a new study released Wednesday, underscoring the enormous challenges health care workers are now facing. (AP Photo/Al-hadji Kudra Maliro, File)
March 28, 2019 - 5:24 am
DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — One out of four people interviewed in eastern Congo last year believed Ebola wasn't real, according to a new study, underscoring the enormous challenges health care workers are facing in what has become the second-deadliest outbreak in history. The survey released late...
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This Feb 23, 2019, photo shows the inside of a computer with the ASUS logo in Jersey City, N.J. Security researchers say hackers infected tens of thousands of computers from the Taiwanese vendor ASUS with malicious software for months last year through the company’s online automatic update service. Kaspersky Labs said Monday, March 25, that the exploit likely affected more than 1 million computers from the world’s No. 5 computer company, though it was designed to surgically install a backdoor in a much smaller number of PCs. (AP Photo/Jenny Kane)
March 25, 2019 - 9:54 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Security researchers say that hackers infected tens of thousands of computers from the Taiwanese vendor ASUS with malicious software last year through the company's online automatic update service. Kaspersky Lab, a Russian cybersecurity firm, said Monday that it detected 57,000...
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FILE - In this Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016 file photo, Shiite Muslim men beat themselves with knives attached to chains during a procession to mark Ashoura in Kabul, Afghanistan. In a report released on Wednesday, March 13, 2019, researchers say self-flagellation should be added to the list of ways to spread a dangerous viral blood infection. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)
March 13, 2019 - 4:15 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Add self-flagellation to the list of ways to get a dangerous viral blood infection. Researchers said Wednesday that they were initially puzzled how 10 British men had become infected with a little-known virus, because the men hadn't taken risks usually associated with the infection...
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March 04, 2019 - 7:25 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Researchers say a London man appears to be free of the AIDS virus after a stem cell transplant. It's the second such success since "Berlin patient" Timothy Ray Brown more than a decade ago. Such transplants are dangerous and have failed in other patients. The new findings were...
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This 2013 photo provided by the Boyce Thompson Institute shows corn leaf aphids used in a study to modify crop plants through engineered viruses. In an opinion paper published Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018, in the journal Science, the authors say the U.S. needs to provide greater justification for the peace-time purpose of its Insect Allies project to avoid being perceived as hostile to other countries. Other experts expressed ethical and security concerns with the research, which seeks to transmit protective traits to crops already growing in the field. (Meena Haribal/Boyce Thompson Institute via AP)
October 04, 2018 - 4:14 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A research arm of the U.S. military is exploring the possibility of deploying insects to make plants more resilient by altering their genes. Some experts say the work may be seen as a potential biological weapon. In an opinion paper published Thursday in the journal Science, the...
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FILE - In this May 10, 2012, file photo, a doctor holds Truvada pills at her office in San Francisco. New research shows more promise for using AIDS treatment drugs, such as Truvada, as a prevention tool, to help keep uninfected people from catching HIV during sex with a partner who has the virus. Truvada has been shown to help prevent infection when one partner has the virus and one does not, but the evidence so far has been strongest for male-female couples. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
July 24, 2018 - 3:25 am
New research shows more promise for using AIDS treatment drugs as a prevention tool, to help keep uninfected people from catching HIV during sex with a partner who has the virus. In one study, there were no infections among gay men who used a two-drug combo pill either daily or just before and...
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