State courts

Brett Busby, appointed by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott to fill a vacancy on the Texas Supreme Court, attends his Senate confirmation hearing Thursday, March 7, 2019, in Austin, Texas. Barely three months after Texas Democrats showed signs of cracking Republican dominance in Texas elections, Abbott is using the power of his office to stem that tide by appointing Republican judges who had been rejected by voters to new positions on the bench. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
March 07, 2019 - 3:27 pm
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Gov. Greg Abbott has quietly been stocking Texas courts with Republican judges freshly rejected by voters, employing one of the strongest powers of his office to stem the erosion of the GOP's decades-long dominance in the state. In the three months since the worst election...
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This undated photo provided by the U.S. Military Academy at West Point shows West Point Cadet Peter Zhu who died on Feb. 28, 2019 of injuries he sustained while skiing on Feb. 23 at Victor Constant Ski Area on the academy grounds. The parents of Peter Zhu have received a judge's permission to retrieve his sperm for possible artificial insemination. (U.S. Military Academy at West Point via AP)
March 04, 2019 - 10:14 pm
WEST POINT, N.Y. (AP) — The parents of a 21-year-old West Point cadet fatally injured in a skiing accident raced the clock to get a judge's permission to retrieve his sperm for "the possibility of preserving some piece of our child that might live on." U.S. Military Academy Cadet Peter Zhu was...
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March 04, 2019 - 9:57 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court won't hear a case about whether states can exclude religious buildings from getting public money for historic preservation work. The justices declined Monday to hear the case from New Jersey's Morris County. In 2002 the county created a historic preservation...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Alabama Department of Corrections shows a police mug shot of Vernon Madison, who is scheduled to be executed for the 1985 murder of Mobile police officer Julius Schulte. The Supreme Court is ordering a new state court hearing to determine whether an Alabama death row inmate is so affected by dementia that he can't be executed. The justices ruled 5-3 on Wednesday, feb. 27, 2019 in favor of Madison. His lawyers say he has suffered strokes that have left him with severe dementia. (Alabama Department of Corrections, via AP, File)
February 27, 2019 - 4:02 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is ordering a new state court hearing to determine whether an Alabama death row inmate is so affected by dementia that he can't be executed. The justices ruled 5-3 on Wednesday in favor of inmate Vernon Madison, who killed a police officer in 1985. His lawyers...
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February 23, 2019 - 9:59 am
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The developer of the Dakota Access oil pipeline is going after the environmental group Greenpeace in state court in North Dakota, after a judge tossed the company's $1 billion racketeering claim out of federal court. Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners on Thursday sued...
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FILE -- In this Feb. 20, 2019 photo a man holds a weapon of the gun maker Heckler & Koch in Berlin, Germany. The regional court in the German city of Stuttgart has convicted two former employees of gun maker Heckler & Koch over their role in delivering weapons that ended up in troubled areas of Mexico. It has fined the company 3.7 million euros ($4.2 million), the value of the proceeds. (Wolfgang Kumm/dpa via AP, file)
February 21, 2019 - 8:06 am
BERLIN (AP) — A German court on Thursday convicted two former employees of gun maker Heckler & Koch over their role in the delivery of weapons that ended up in troubled areas of Mexico, and ordered the confiscation of proceeds from the sales totaling some 3.7 million euros ($4.2 million). The...
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February 20, 2019 - 12:07 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court said Wednesday that the state of West Virginia unlawfully discriminated against a retired U.S. marshal when it excluded him from a more generous tax break given to onetime state law enforcement officers. The court ruled unanimously for retired marshal James...
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In this Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019 photo, Rachel Sweet, a lobbyist for Planned Parenthood Great Plains, watches at the Kansas Senate debates a resolution condemning New York's new abortion law, at the Statehouse in Topeka, Kansas. She says, "I think this about political grandstanding." (AP Photo/John Hanna)
February 14, 2019 - 2:52 pm
TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Kansas abortion opponents are as eager as ever to impose new restrictions but aren't sure of their options because the state's legal climate is uncertain. So in the meantime, they're putting their energy into condemning New York's new law protecting abortion rights. The Kansas...
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Attorney General Kwame Raoul, left, and Kane County State's Attorney Joseph McMahon speak during a news conference Monday, Feb. 11, 2019, in Chicago. Raoul and McMahon, who won the conviction against Jason Van Dyke, said they believe Judge Vincent Gaughan did not properly apply the law when he sentenced Van Dyke to six years and nine months in prison. In a rare move, they filed a request with the Illinois Supreme Court seeking an order that would send the case back to Gaughan for a new sentence. (AP Photo/Noreen Nasir)
February 11, 2019 - 6:51 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Prosecutors on Monday asked Illinois' highest court to review the less than seven year prison sentence for the white Chicago police officer who fatally shot black teenager Laquan McDonald — an unusual move in what was already a rare case. Illinois Attorney General Kwame Raoul and the...
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Michelle Carter, 22, appears in Taunton District Court in Taunton, Mass. Monday, February 11, 2019 for a hearing on her prison sentence. Carter was convicted in 2017 of involuntary manslaughter and sentenced to a 15 month prison term for encouraging 18-year-old Conrad Roy, III to kill himself when she instructed him over the phone to get back in his truck that was filling with toxic gas in July 2014. Her sentence was put on hold while the court reviewed the case and the defense argument that her actions were not criminal. Her conviction was upheld. Carter was jailed Monday on an involuntary manslaughter conviction. (Mark Stockwell/The Sun Chronicle via AP, Pool)
February 11, 2019 - 5:01 pm
TAUNTON, Mass. (AP) — A Massachusetts woman who sent her suicidal boyfriend a barrage of text messages urging him to kill himself was jailed Monday on an involuntary manslaughter conviction nearly five years after he died in a truck filled with toxic gas. Michelle Carter was sentenced to 15 months...
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