State courts

FILE - In this Jan. 24, 2019, file photo, the Supreme Court is seen at sunset in Washington. A long-delayed disaster aid bill that’s a top political priority for some of President Donald Trump’s GOP allies is facing a potentially tricky path as it heads to the Senate floor this week. Although the measure has wide backing from both parties, the White House isn’t pleased with the bill and is particularly opposed to efforts by Democrats to make hurricane relief to Puerto Rico more generous. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
March 25, 2019 - 12:16 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Last year, proponents of limiting partisan politics in the creation of electoral districts needed to win over Justice Anthony Kennedy. They couldn't. The issue is back before the Supreme Court again, with arguments on Tuesday, and it might be harder than ever to convince the...
Read More
FILE - This 2012 file photo released by the Oktibbeha County Sheriff's Office in Mississippi shows Jessica Jauch, who was jailed 96 days without seeing a judge. A Mississippi jury in federal court awarded $250,000 in damages to Jauch, Tuesday, March 19, 2019. In 2012 she was jailed on a drug indictment and eventually cleared after video didn't show her committing a crime. (Oktibbeha County Sheriff's Office via AP, File)
March 20, 2019 - 7:59 pm
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A Mississippi jury awarded $250,000 in damages Tuesday to a woman jailed 96 days without seeing a judge, a case spotlighting how Mississippi still struggles to provide access to lawyers or bail to people jailed before trial. The verdict included $200,000 in damages against...
Read More
March 20, 2019 - 12:58 pm
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri regulators reversed course Wednesday and gave the go-ahead to one of the nation's largest renewable energy projects — a high-voltage power line delivering wind energy from the Midwest to a power grid for eastern states. The proposed Grain Belt Express...
Read More
FILE - In this Oct., 2018 file photo, Chicago police Officer Jason Van Dyke watches the prosecution's closing statements during his first degree murder trial for the shooting death of Laquan McDonald at the Leighton Criminal Court Building in Chicago. The Illinois Supreme Court has let stand a less than seven year prison sentence for a white Chicago police officer convicted of killing black teenager Laquan McDonald that some critics characterized as a slap on the wrist. A Tuesday, March 19, 2019 decision denies a bid by Illinois attorney general Kwame Raoul and a special prosecutor to re-sentence Jason Van Dyke. The February request focused on highly legalistic issues surrounding sentencing guidelines. (Antonio Perez/Chicago Tribune via AP, Pool, File)
March 19, 2019 - 12:38 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — The Illinois Supreme Court on Tuesday said it would let stand a less than seven year prison sentence for a white Chicago police officer convicted of killing black teenager Laquan McDonald that many criticized as far too lenient. The decision denies a rare bid by the Illinois attorney...
Read More
This Aug. 3, 2017 photo provided by Mississippi Department of Corrections shows Curtis Flowers, who's murder case has gone to trial six times. Supreme Court justices are again considering how to keep prosecutors from removing African-Americans from criminal juries for racially biased reasons, this time in a case involving a Mississippi death row inmate who has been tried six times for murder. (Mississippi Department of Corrections via AP)
March 19, 2019 - 12:36 pm
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A black Mississippi man who has been tried six times for murder says his latest conviction and death sentence should be thrown out for a familiar reason — the prosecutor's practice of keeping African-Americans off the jury. Curtis Flowers has been jailed in Mississippi for 22...
Read More
FILE - In this Dec. 19, 2011 file photo, Taeko Bufford, left, and Diane Cervelli, right, pose for a photo in Honolulu. The U.S. Supreme Court is rejecting an appeal from a Hawaii bed and breakfast that wouldn't rent a room to the lesbian couple. The justices on Monday, March 18, 2019 left in place Hawaii state court rulings that found the Aloha Bed & Breakfast in Honolulu violated Hawaii's anti-discrimination law by turning the couple away. Owner Phyllis Young had argued she should be allowed to turn away gay couples because of her religious beliefs. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
March 18, 2019 - 4:28 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday left in place Hawaii court rulings that found a bed and breakfast owner violated the state's anti-discrimination law by refusing to rent a room to a lesbian couple. The justices rejected an appeal from Aloha Bed & Breakfast owner Phyllis Young,...
Read More
FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2013, file photo, firearms training unit Detective Barbara J. Mattson, of the Connecticut State Police, holds a Bushmaster AR-15 rifle, the same make and model used by Adam Lanza in the 2012 Sandy Hook School shooting, during a hearing at the Legislative Office Building in Hartford, Conn. A divided Connecticut Supreme Court ruled, Thursday, March 14, 2019, gun maker Remington can be sued over how it marketed the Bushmaster rifle used in the massacre. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
March 14, 2019 - 4:43 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Gun-maker Remington can be sued over how it marketed the rifle used to kill 20 children and six educators at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012, a divided Connecticut Supreme Court ruled Thursday. Gun control advocates touted the ruling as providing a possible roadmap for...
Read More
In this Oct. 18, 2018 file photo, Summer Zervos leaves New York state appellate court in New York. A New York appeals court has ruled that President Donald Trump isn't immune from a defamation lawsuit filed by the former "Apprentice" contestant who accused him of unwanted kissing and groping. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, FILE)
March 14, 2019 - 1:02 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A New York appeals court ruled Thursday that President Donald Trump isn't immune from a defamation lawsuit filed by a former "Apprentice" contestant who accused him of unwanted kissing and groping. A panel of judges on the Supreme Court Appellate Division said in their ruling, in a...
Read More
Flanked by lawmakers, Gov. Gavin Newsom discusses his decision to place a moratorium on the death penalty during a news conference at the Capitol, March 13, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
March 13, 2019 - 8:20 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Gov. Gavin Newsom not only put a moratorium on executions in California on Wednesday, he said he also may commute death sentences and is pushing to repeal capital punishment. Newsom signed an executive order granting reprieves to all 737 condemned inmates on the nation's...
Read More
FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2018 file photo, family and friends who have lost loved ones to OxyContin and opioid overdoses leave pill bottles in protest outside the headquarters of Purdue Pharma, which is owned by the Sackler family, in Stamford, Conn. The company that has made billions selling the prescription painkiller OxyContin says it is considering bankruptcy as one of several possible legal options, in an email to The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
March 13, 2019 - 5:04 pm
The company that has made billions selling the prescription painkiller OxyContin said Wednesday that it is considering legal options including bankruptcy, a move that could upend hundreds of lawsuits claiming it had a major role in causing the U.S. opioid drug crisis. "As the company has stated, it...
Read More

Pages