Science

FILE - In this Monday, April 13, 2020 file photo, a patient arrives in an ambulance cared for by medical workers wearing personal protective equipment due to COVID-19 coronavirus concerns outside NYU Langone Medical Center in New York. The official U.S. count of coronavirus cases and deaths may grow a bit more dramatically, after a decision by federal health officials on Tuesday, April 15, 2020, to green light the inclusion of illnesses that are not confirmed by lab testing. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
SKY News
April 15, 2020 - 4:32 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. tally of coronavirus cases and deaths could soon jump because federal health officials will now count illnesses that are not confirmed by lab testing. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told states Tuesday to include probable COVID-19 cases in their reports to...
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Patients and medical workers wear personal protective equipment due to COVID-19 concerns outside the emergency room at NYU Langone Medical Center, Monday, April 13, 2020, in New York. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people, but for some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
SKY News
April 13, 2020 - 11:02 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — New York's coronavirus death toll topped 10,000 and the worldwide number of confirmed cases hovered around 2 million on Monday, even as the lack of fresh hot spots globally yielded a ray of optimism and fueled discussions about how some places might begin to reopen. The brunt of...
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In this April 3, 2020, photo, blue preservation solution is shown at Spectrum DNA in Draper, Utah. The company has developed a test kit to detect the coronavirus in patients' saliva. At least two Utah companies have developed tests and gotten emergency authorization from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration: molecular diagnostics company Co-Diagnostics and ancestry-testing kit maker Spectrum DNA. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
SKY News
April 13, 2020 - 4:52 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Rutgers University researchers have received U.S. government clearance for the first saliva test to help diagnose COVID-19, a new approach that could help expand testing options and reduce risks of infection for health care workers. The Food and Drug Administration authorized the...
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In this Wednesday, April 8, 2020 photo provided by the Center for Pharmaceutical Research, a participant in a COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine trial receives an injection in Kansas City, Mo. This early safety study, called a Phase 1 trial, is using a vaccine candidate developed by Inovio Pharmaceuticals. (Center for Pharmaceutical Research via AP)
SKY News
April 08, 2020 - 5:07 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. researchers have opened another safety test of an experimental COVID-19 vaccine, this one using a skin-deep shot instead of the usual deeper jab. The pinch should feel like a simple skin test, a researcher told the volunteer lying on an exam table in Kansas City, Missouri, on...
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In this March 2020 photo provided by Gilead Sciences, a vial of the investigational drug remdesivir is visually inspected at a Gilead manufacturing site in the United States. Given through an IV, the medication is designed to interfere with an enzyme that reproduces viral genetic material. (Gilead Sciences via AP)
SKY News
April 06, 2020 - 9:12 am
The new coronavirus made Dr. Jag Singh a patient at his own hospital. His alarm grew as he saw an X-ray of his pneumonia-choked lungs and colleagues asked his wishes about life support while wheeling him into Massachusetts General’s intensive care unit. When they offered him a chance to help test...
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In this photo made on, April 2, 2020, nurse anesthetist Jessica Poole checks for updates on the coronavirus pandemic in her home office in Greensburg, Pa. Poole, until a couple weeks ago, worked for a private anesthesia practice that serves the Pittsburgh area until she was laid off. She is one of the tens of thousands of medical workers across the United States suddenly out of work as operating rooms and doctor's offices go dark, casualties of urgent calls to prioritize coronavirus patients at overwhelmed hospitals and of the economic waves the crisis is churning. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
April 04, 2020 - 11:17 am
HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Tens of thousands of medical workers across the United States are suddenly out of work as operating rooms and doctor's offices go dark, casualties of urgent calls to prioritize coronavirus patients at overwhelmed hospitals and of the economic waves the crisis is churning...
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A man wears a mask while crossing in front of the Stockton Street Tunnel in San Francisco, Sunday, March 29, 2020. Californians endured a weekend of stepped-up restrictions aimed at keeping them home as much as possible while hospitals and health officials scrambled Sunday to ready themselves for a week that could see the feared dramatic surge in coronavirus cases. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
SKY News
March 31, 2020 - 7:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — If you’re not sick with the new coronavirus, should you wear a mask in public? Global health authorities say no. Amid a shortage of masks, the U.S. is sticking with that advice but Tuesday, President Donald Trump suggested people who are worried wear a scarf. That shortage is so...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, March 25, 2020 file photo Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson leaves 10 Downing Street for the House of Commons for his weekly Prime Ministers Questions, in London. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has tested positive for the new coronavirus. Johnson's office said Friday March 27, 2020 that he was tested after showing mild symptoms, Downing St. says Johnson is self-isolating and continuing to lead the country's response to COVID-19. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)
SKY News
March 27, 2020 - 10:09 am
LONDON (AP) — British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has tested positive for the new coronavirus, the first leader of a major nation to contract COVID-19, but he insisted Friday that he remains in charge of the U.K.'s response to the outbreak. Johnson, 55, said he was tested Thursday on the advice of...
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In this photo released by Saudi Press Agency, SPA, Saudi King Salman, chairs a video call of world leaders from the Group of 20 and other international bodies and organizations, from his office in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Thursday, March 26, 2020. The meeting is aimed at coordinating the global response to the fast-spreading coronavirus, which has shuttered businesses and forced well over a quarter of the world's population into home isolation. (Saudi Press Agency via AP)
SKY News
March 26, 2020 - 10:18 am
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Leaders of the world's most powerful economies convened virtually on Thursday with the aim of coordinating a global response to the fast-spreading coronavirus, which has shuttered businesses and forced well over a quarter of the world's population into home...
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FILE - In this Feb. 27, 1941 file photo President Franklin D. Roosevelt speaks on the radio from the Oval Room of the White House. During an extraordinary 12 years in office, Roosevelt guided the nation through a bleak period of Depression-era unemployment, a severe Midwest drought known as the Dust Bowl and battle against the Nazis and Japanese in World War II. (AP Photo/Henry Griffin, File)
March 23, 2020 - 12:22 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Woodrow Wilson was more focused on the end of World War I than a flu virus that was making its way around the globe, ultimately sickening hundreds of thousands of Americans, including the president himself. George W. Bush stood with a bullhorn on a pile of rubble after the 9/11...
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