National courts

FILE - In this June 21, 2019 file photo, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania William McSwain speaks with members of the media at a news conference at the U.S. Custom House in Philadelphia. A federal judge ruled Wednesday, Oct. 2, that a Philadelphia nonprofit’s proposal to open the nation’s first supervised injection site does not violate federal law,the first court decision in the country to definitively weigh in on the matter. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
October 02, 2019 - 4:48 pm
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A federal judge ruled Wednesday that supervised injection sites designed to prevent overdoses would not violate federal drug laws, potentially giving advocates in Philadelphia and elsewhere a boost in their efforts to open such centers. U.S. District Judge Gerald A. McHugh said...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Missouri Department of Corrections shows Russell Bucklew. Bucklew is scheduled to die by injection Oct. 1, 2019 for killing a southeast Missouri man during a violent crime rampage in 1996. Bucklew suffers from a rare medical condition that causes blood-filled tumors in his head, neck and throat, and he had a tracheostomy tube inserted in 2018. His attorneys say he faces the risk of a "grotesque execution process." Missouri Gov. Mike Parson, who is considering clemency in the execution for tomorrow. (Missouri Department of Corrections via AP File)
October 01, 2019 - 11:39 pm
ST. LOUIS (AP) — A Missouri inmate was executed Tuesday for killing a man in 1996 in a string of violence that included several other crimes, despite concerns that the prisoner's rare medical condition would cause a gruesome lethal injection. Russell Bucklew was put to death at the state prison in...
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FILE - In this July 16, 2019, file photo, people stop to record images of Widener Library on the campus of Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. U.S. District Judge Allison D. Burroughs ruled, Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2019, that Harvard does not discriminate against Asian Americans in its admissions process. The judge issued the ruling in a 2014 lawsuit that alleged Harvard holds Asian American applicants to a higher standard than students of other races. Burroughs said Harvard's admissions process is not perfect but passes constitutional muster. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
October 01, 2019 - 5:38 pm
BOSTON (AP) — A federal judge Tuesday cleared Harvard University of discriminating against Asian American applicants in a ruling that was seen as a major victory for supporters of affirmative action in college admissions across the U.S. In a closely watched lawsuit that had raised fears about the...
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FILE - This Jan. 11, 2018 file photo shows Judge Dan Polster in his office, in Cleveland. Attorneys representing eight drug distributors, pharmacies and retailers facing trial for their roles in the national opioid crisis are seeking to disqualify the federal judge overseeing their cases saying he’s shown clear bias in his efforts to obtain a multi-billion dollar global settlement. The motion was filed late Friday, Sept. 13, 2019, in U.S. District Court in Cleveland, where Judge Dan Polster presides over most of the 2,000 lawsuits filed by state, local and tribal governments. Polster has not responded. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
October 01, 2019 - 5:34 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A group of drug retailers and distributors asked an Ohio federal appeals court Tuesday to disqualify the judge overseeing national opioid litigation after the judge himself denied their requests. Walmart, Walgreens, CVS, Rite Aid and drug distributors AmerisourceBergen,...
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Thousands of secession supporters march during a demonstration in Barcelona, Spain, Tuesday Oct. 1, 2019. Larger protests were scheduled later in the day amid heightened security measures across the wealthy Catalonia region of 7.5 million people, where separatist sentiment has been on the rise for nearly a decade. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
October 01, 2019 - 5:27 pm
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — Thousands of supporters of the secession of Catalonia from the rest of Spain marched in Barcelona on Tuesday to mark two years since a banned independence referendum that shook Spanish politics and set off the nation's worst institutional crisis in decades. More rallies were...
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FILE - This Dec. 28, 2016, file photo shows the two buttes that make up the namesake for Utah's Bears Ears National Monument in southeastern Utah. A federal judge has rejected the Trump administration's bid to dismiss lawsuits challenging the constitutionality of a 2017 decision to downsize two sprawling national monuments in Utah. (Francisco Kjolseth/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)
October 01, 2019 - 4:47 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A federal judge has rejected the Trump administration's bid to dismiss lawsuits challenging the constitutionality of a 2017 decision to downsize two sprawling national monuments in Utah. U.S. District Court Judge Tanya Chutkan's written decisions issued Monday night means the...
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October 01, 2019 - 4:15 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A federal judge in New York has ruled that the 2017 federal tax overhaul's cap on state and local tax deductions was not an "unconstitutional assault" on the sovereignty of high-tax Democratic-leaning states. Judge J. Paul Oetken dismissed a challenge on Monday to the Republican-led...
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FILE - In this Dec. 14, 2017, file photo, after a meeting voting to end net neutrality, Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Ajit Pai smiles while listening to a question from a reporter in Washington. A federal court is ruling that the FCC had the right to dump net-neutrality rules, but couldn't bar states like California from passing their own. The ruling is largely a victory for Pai. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
October 01, 2019 - 4:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal court has cleared the way for state and local governments to bar internet providers from favoring some services over others, even as the court affirmed the Federal Communications Commission's right to dump national rules. Even so, legal experts say state and local...
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FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2019 file photo, U.S. Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y., speaks to reporters as he leaves the courthouse after a pretrial hearing in his insider-trading case, in New York. Collins is resigning from his seat ahead of an expected guilty plea in an insider trading case in which he was accused of leaking confidential information during an urgent phone call made from a White House picnic. Collins submitted a resignation letter Monday, Sept. 30, 2019 according to a spokesman for House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. It will take effect when Congress meets in a brief session on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
October 01, 2019 - 9:48 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Former U.S. Rep. Chris Collins is scheduled to appear before a federal judge for an expected guilty plea in an insider trading case. Congress made the New York Republican's resignation official Tuesday morning, hours before a planned 3 p.m. appearance before a federal judge in...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Missouri Department of Corrections shows Russell Bucklew. Bucklew is scheduled to die by injection Oct. 1, 2019 for killing a southeast Missouri man during a violent crime rampage in 1996. Bucklew suffers from a rare medical condition that causes blood-filled tumors in his head, neck and throat, and he had a tracheostomy tube inserted in 2018. His attorneys say he faces the risk of a "grotesque execution process." Missouri Gov. Mike Parson, who is considering clemency in the execution for tomorrow. (Missouri Department of Corrections via AP File)
September 30, 2019 - 11:54 pm
ST. LOUIS (AP) — The fate of a condemned Missouri inmate rests with Gov. Mike Parson, who must decide if the risk posed by Russell Bucklew's unusual medical condition is grave enough to halt his execution. Bucklew is scheduled to be put to death Tuesday evening for killing a man during a violent...
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