Military recruitment

FILE - In this Feb. 27, 2019, file photo, from left, transgender military members Navy Lt. Cmdr. Blake Dremann, Army Capt. Alivia Stehlik, Army Capt. Jennifer Peace, Army Staff Sgt. Patricia King and Navy Petty Officer Third Class Akira Wyatt, listen before the start of a House Armed Services Subcommittee on Military Personnel hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Defense Department has approved a new policy that will largely bar transgender troops and military recruits from transitioning to another sex, and require most individuals to serve in their birth gender. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
March 12, 2019 - 11:47 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Defense Department has approved a new policy that will largely bar transgender troops and military recruits from transitioning to another sex, and require most individuals to serve in their birth gender. The memo outlining the new policy was obtained Tuesday by The Associated...
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FILE - In this Jan. 9, 2019 file photo, construction crews install new border wall sections seen from Tijuana, Mexico. Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., says the Pentagon is planning to tap $1 billion in leftover funds from military pay and pensions accounts to help President Donald Trump pay for his long-sought border wall. Durbin told The Associated Press, “it’s coming out of military pay and pensions, $1 billion, that’s the plan.”(AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)
March 07, 2019 - 4:32 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon is planning to tap $1 billion in leftover funds from military pay and pension accounts to help President Donald Trump pay for his long-sought border wall, a top Senate Democrat said Thursday. Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., told The Associated Press, "It's coming out of...
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This November 2017 photo provided by Badamsereejid Gansukh shows him in front of a U.S. military recruiting office in New York's Times Square. Gansukh, whose recruiter told him his Turkish language skills would be an asset to the military, said he didn’t know he was discharged at all until he asked his congressman’s office in the summer of 2018 to help him figure out why his security screening was taking so long. (Courtesy of Badamsereejid Gansukh via AP)
October 11, 2018 - 9:00 pm
Over the course of 12 months, the U.S. Army discharged more than 500 immigrant enlistees who were recruited across the globe for their language or medical skills and promised a fast track to citizenship in exchange for their service, The Associated Press has found. The decade-old Military...
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October 08, 2018 - 6:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — It will take time to overcome the recruiting challenges that caused the U.S. Army to miss its enlistment goal this year, but plans to beef up recruiting and other changes will enable the service to get the recruits it needs in 2019, top Army leaders said Monday. Gen. Mark Milley,...
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FILE - In this July 3, 2018, file photo, a Pakistani recruit, 22, who was recently discharged from the U.S. Army, holds an American flag as he poses for a picture. The U.S. Army has stopped discharging immigrant recruits who enlisted seeking a path to citizenship - at least temporarily. A memo shared with The Associated Press on Wednesday, Aug. 8 and dated July 20 spells out orders to high-ranking Army officials to stop processing discharges of men and women who enlisted in the special immigrant program, effective immediately. (AP Photo/Mike Knaak, File)
August 09, 2018 - 10:11 pm
The U.S. Army has stopped discharging immigrant recruits who enlisted seeking a path to citizenship — at least temporarily. A memo shared with The Associated Press spells out orders to high-ranking Army officials to stop processing discharges of men and women who enlisted in the special immigrant...
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FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2016, file photo, Army drill sergeants stand over recruits during a live-fire marksmanship training course at Fort Jackson, S.C. Under the gun to increase the size of the force, the Army is pouring an extra $200 million into bonuses this year to attract and retain soldiers, and has approved more drug use and conduct waivers for recruits in order to build the ranks. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)
August 01, 2018 - 3:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Under the gun to increase the size of the force, the Army is issuing more waivers for past drug use or bad conduct by recruits, and pouring an extra $200 million into bonuses this year to attract and retain soldiers. According to data obtained by The Associated Press, nearly one-...
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