Intelligence agencies

Attorney General William Barr speaks alongside Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, right, and acting Principal Associate Deputy Attorney General Edward O'Callaghan, left, about the release of a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report during a news conference, Thursday, April 18, 2019, at the Department of Justice in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
April 18, 2019 - 8:30 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — It may be special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation report , but the spotlight Thursday belonged just as much to the attorney general who made it public. The report had not yet been released when William Barr, by turns testy and defensive, took the Justice Department...
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Special counsel Robert Mueller's report, with redactions, as released on Thursday, April 18, 2019, is photographed in Washington. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
April 18, 2019 - 7:41 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on special counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russia and President Donald Trump (all times local): 7:35 p.m. Special counsel Robert Mueller's report suggests that the chairman of the Senate intelligence committee may have shared information with the White House after a...
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The redacted, right, and the unredacted versions of the biographical intelligence file report on Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet from 1975 is photographed on April 15, 2019, in Washington. In 2003, the Defense Intelligence Agency declassified the documents that included a biographical sketch of Pinochet. Attorney General William Barr’s announcement that he would release a “redacted” version of Mueller’s findings will likely set off a long debate over what’s behind the darkened patches. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
April 16, 2019 - 12:11 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Somewhere in the shadows of federal bureaucracy, there was an issue about the drinking habits of Augusto Pinochet. The National Security Archive, an advocate for open government, had for years tried to gain access to intelligence files about the Chilean dictator, his human rights...
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Attorney General William Barr reacts as he appears before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee to make his Justice Department budget request, Wednesday, April 10, 2019, in Washington. Barr said Wednesday that he was reviewing the origins of the Trump-Russia investigation. He said he believed the president's campaign had been spied on and he was concerned about possible abuses of government power. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
April 11, 2019 - 6:31 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General William Barr declared he thinks "spying did occur" against Donald Trump's presidential campaign, suggesting the origins of the Russia investigation may have been mishandled, in remarks that aligned him with the president at a time when Barr's independence is under...
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Attorney General William Barr appears before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee to make his Justice Department budget request, Wednesday, April 10, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
April 10, 2019 - 6:56 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General William Barr declared Wednesday he thinks "spying did occur" against Donald Trump's presidential campaign, suggesting the origins of the Russia investigation may have been mishandled in remarks that aligned him with the president at a time when Barr's independence...
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Attorney General William Barr appears before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee to make his Justice Department budget request, Wednesday, April 10, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
April 10, 2019 - 4:29 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Attorney General William Barr's testimony to Congress and the Russia probe (all times local): 4:20 p.m. Attorney General William Barr says he thinks "spying did occur" on Donald Trump's presidential campaign, suggesting the origins of the Russia investigation may...
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This image provided by the FBI in a U.S. District Court filing in Washington on feb. 29, 2019, shows Mustafa al-Imam after his capture in October 2017. The interrogation of the Libyan militant accused of playing an instrumental role in the 2012 Benghazi attacks may be admitted at his trial next month, a federal judge ruled April 8, 2019. U.S. District Judge Christopher R. Cooper rejected defense attorneys’ claims that al-Imam had been suffering from mental trauma and seasickness in the days after his 2017 abduction in Libya. Al-Imam is scheduled to stand trial in May 2019 in Washington on murder and terrorism charges. (FBI via AP)
April 09, 2019 - 2:21 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The interrogation of a Libyan militant accused of playing an instrumental role in the 2012 Benghazi attacks was conducted lawfully and may be admitted at his trial next month, a federal judge has ruled. U.S. District Judge Christopher Cooper on Monday rejected defense attorneys'...
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In this May 27, 2013 photo, Justice William Young of the Supreme Court pays tribute at the funeral of Supreme Court judge Sir Robert Chambers, in Auckland, New Zealand. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has named Young, a sitting Supreme Court justice, to head New Zealand's top level investigation into the actions of security agencies and other issues related to the mosque shootings last month in which 50 people were killed. (Natalie Slade/New Zealand Herald via AP)
April 08, 2019 - 2:22 am
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has named a sitting Supreme Court justice to head New Zealand's top level investigation into the actions of security agencies and other issues related to the mosque shootings last month in which 50 people were killed. The Royal Commission...
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April 04, 2019 - 6:14 am
ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) — Prosecutors and defense attorneys will be asking for vastly different prison terms as a former CIA officer is formally sentenced for spying for China. A jury convicted Kevin Mallory of Leesburg last year under the Espionage Act for providing top secret information to Chinese...
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FILE - In this March 3, 2005, file photo, a workman dusts the floor at the Central Intelligence Agency headquarters in Langley, Va. The American Civil Liberties Union has filed a lawsuit challenging a pre-publication review required for people who have had access to government secrets. The CIA says the pre-publication review is necessary to protect national security and protect former employees from legal liability. Timothy Barrett, a CIA spokesman, said the agency “does not comment on pending litigation." (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
April 02, 2019 - 4:17 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Civil liberties groups have filed a lawsuit challenging a pre-publication review required for people who have had access to government secrets. Millions of former government and intelligence agency employees are bound by a lifelong obligation to keep national security secrets as...
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