Immigration policy

August 16, 2019 - 12:32 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California and three other states are filing the latest court challenge to new Trump administration rules blocking green cards for many immigrants who use Medicaid, food stamps, housing vouchers or other forms of public assistance. California Attorney General Xavier...
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In this still image from video provided by WLNE-TV, protesters blocking an entrance to the Donald W. Wyatt Detention Facility begin to move as a pickup truck approaches, Wednesday night, Aug. 14, 2019, in Central Falls, R.I. The group, which was protesting federal immigration policies, said at least two people were injured. Rhode Island's attorney general said he is investigating the incident. (WLNE-TV via AP)MANDATORY CREDIT
August 15, 2019 - 5:38 pm
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Rhode Island's attorney general and state police launched investigations Thursday after a truck drove at a group protesting federal immigration policies at a detention center, which has since placed an employee on leave. At least two people were injured, one seriously,...
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File - In this July 9, 2019, file photo, immigrants play soccer at the U.S. government's newest holding center for migrant children in Carrizo Springs, Texas. A panel of judges has dismissed an appeal by the U.S. government that contended detained immigrant children might necessarily require soap for shorter stints in custody under a longstanding settlement agreement. A three-judge panel for the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco on Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019, dismissed a challenge to a lower court decision that authorities failed to provide safe and sanitary conditions for the children under the 1997 settlement. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
August 15, 2019 - 4:18 pm
Immigrant children detained by the U.S. government should get edible food, clean water, soap and toothpaste under a longstanding agreement over detention conditions, a federal appeals panel ruled Thursday in dismissing a Trump administration bid to limit what must be provided. A three-judge panel...
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Jamie Pfister, associate administrator for Regional Operations and Program Delivery at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, speaks during a news conference at the headquarters of the Department of Transportation in Washington, Wednesday Aug. 14, 2019. About 30,000 police officers will be out in the streets making traffic stops around the United States for the next two weeks in an effort to crack down on impaired driving. (AP Photo/Luis Alonso Lugo)
August 14, 2019 - 5:55 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — About 30,000 police officers will be out on the roads around the country through the Labor Day weekend to crack down on impaired driving, an annual effort that this year poses potential risks to immigrants who fear getting stopped and deported. The National Highway Traffic Safety...
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Acting Director of United States Citizenship and Immigration Services Ken Cuccinelli, speaks during a briefing at the White House, Monday, Aug. 12, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
August 14, 2019 - 11:30 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A top Trump administration official says that the famous inscription on the Statue of Liberty welcoming immigrants into the country is about "people coming from Europe" and that America is looking to receive migrants "who can stand on their own two feet." The comments on Tuesday...
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FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2019, file photo, a man is taken into custody at a Koch Foods Inc. plant in Morton, Miss. Unauthorized workers are jailed or deported, while the managers and business owners who profit from their labor often aren't. Under President Donald Trump, the numbers of owners and managers facing criminal charges for employing unauthorized workers have stayed almost the same. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)
August 14, 2019 - 10:16 am
HOUSTON (AP) — Recent immigration raids at Mississippi chicken-processing plants revived a longstanding complaint about government policy: Unauthorized workers are jailed or deported, while the managers and business owners who profit from their labor often go unprosecuted. Under President Donald...
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File - In this Jan. 31, 2019, file photo, hundreds of people overflow onto the sidewalk in a line snaking around the block outside a U.S. immigration office with numerous courtrooms in San Francisco. Santa Clara and San Francisco have filed suit against the Trump administration over its new controversial "public charge" rule that restricts legal immigration. This lawsuit is the first after the Department of Homeland Security's announcement Monday, Aug. 12, 2019, that it would deny green cards to migrants who use Medicaid, food stamps, housing vouchers or other forms of public assistance. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
August 13, 2019 - 3:45 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — San Francisco and Santa Clara counties filed a lawsuit Tuesday challenging the Trump administration's new "public charge" rules to restrict legal immigration. The lawsuit is the first after the Department of Homeland Security's announcement Monday that it would deny green cards...
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Acting Director of United States Citizenship and Immigration Services Ken Cuccinelli, speaks during a briefing at the White House, Monday, Aug. 12, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
August 12, 2019 - 9:47 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on President Donald Trump's new rules for immigrants receiving public assistance (all times local): 1:55 p.m. A major medical association says new guidelines that could be used to deny green cards to immigrants who use public assistance like Medicaid will have drastic...
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Acting Director of United States Citizenship and Immigration Services Ken Cuccinelli, speaks during a briefing at the White House, Monday, Aug. 12, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
August 12, 2019 - 4:32 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration announced Monday it is moving forward with one of its most aggressive steps yet to restrict legal immigration: Denying green cards to many migrants who use Medicaid, food stamps, housing vouchers or other forms of public assistance. Federal law already...
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This photo from video provided by KVOA-TV shows Alex Kack, in the green shirt at left, laughing at a protester during a vote to put a "sanctuary city" initiative on the November ballot during a meeting of the Tucson, Ariz., City Council Tuesday, Aug. 6. Kack is mystified that video of him simply laughing at the meeting has captivated the internet. Kack, also known as "#GreenShirtGuy," told The Associated Press on Thursday that social media reaction spawned by a news clip of him shaking with laughter at a Tucson City Council meeting has been "surreal." (KVOA-TV via AP)
August 08, 2019 - 6:30 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — Alex Kack remained mystified Thursday as to how he became an internet sensation when all he did was laugh at a city council meeting in Arizona. "Everyone else was doing something far more active than me honestly. I was just laughing," Kack told The Associated Press. "You could have...
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