Government surveillance

FILE - In this May 1, 2019 file photo, Attorney General William Barr testifies during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, on the Mueller Report. Former FBI lawyer Kevin Clinesmith will plead guilty to making a false statement in the first criminal case arising from U.S. Attorney John Durham's investigation into the probe of ties between Russia and the 2016 Trump campaign. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
SKY News
September 01, 2020 - 3:50 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department announced new restrictions Tuesday on how it conducts any secret national security surveillance of candidates for federal office or their staff members and advisers. The restrictions, announced by Attorney General William Barr in a pair of memos, are part of...
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Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., speaks during Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, June 3, 2020. (Greg Nash/Pool via AP)
SKY News
June 05, 2020 - 6:53 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Two Republican-led Senate committees have launched election-year investigations into the Justice Department’s Russia probe, resurrecting the issue at the urging of President Donald Trump while reigniting the partisan hostility that comes along with it. In two committee rooms...
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FILE - In this Jan. 24, 2020, file photo, then-U.S. President Donald Trump's envoy for the Kosovo-Serbia dialogue, Ambassador Richard Grenell speaks during a news conference after a meeting with Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic in Belgrade, Serbia. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic, File)
May 13, 2020 - 10:54 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and Republicans are launching a broad election-year attack on the foundation of the Russia investigation, including declassifying intelligence information to try to place senior Obama administration officials under scrutiny for routine actions. The effort...
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In this March 24, 2020, photo, Serbian soldiers set up beds for treatment of possible COVID-19 infected patients inside of the Belgrade Fair, Serbia. In the ex-communist Europe and elsewhere, rulers are assuming more power while they introduce harsh measures they say are necessary to halt coronavirus spread.  (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)
March 31, 2020 - 3:56 am
BELGRADE, Serbia (AP) — Soldiers patrol the streets with their fingers on machine gun triggers. The army guards an exhibition center-turned-makeshift-hospital crowded with rows of metal beds for those infected with the coronavirus. And Serbia’s president warns residents that Belgrade's graveyards...
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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. walks to the Senate Chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, March 16, 2020. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
SKY News
March 17, 2020 - 7:16 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Senate has voted to extend, rather than tweak, three surveillance powers that federal law enforcement officials use to fight terrorists, passing the bill back to an absent House and throwing the future of the authorities in doubt. The 75-day extension pushes off the...
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Attorney General William Barr arrives before President Donald Trump presents the Medal of Freedom to former Vice Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Jack Keane in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, March 10, 2020. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
SKY News
March 10, 2020 - 9:52 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — House lawmakers prepared to extend surveillance authorities that expire this month, releasing legislation that represents a rare bipartisan agreement after members of both parties said they wanted to ensure the tools preserved civil liberties. House Democrats posted the text of a...
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FILE - In a Nov. 2, 2017, file photo, Carter Page, a foreign policy adviser to Donald Trump's 2016 presidential campaign, speaks with reporters following a day of questions from the House Intelligence Committee, on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Justice Department has concluded that it should have ended its surveillance of a former Trump campaign adviser earlier than it did because it lacked “insufficient predication" to continue eavesdropping. That's according to an order made public Thursday by a secretive intelligence court. The FBI obtained a warrant in 2016 to eavesdrop on former Trump national security aide Carter Page on suspicions that he was secretly a Russian agent. The Justice Department renewed the warrant three times, including during the early months of the Trump administration. But the Justice Department's inspector general has harshly criticized the FBI's handing of those applications. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
SKY News
January 25, 2020 - 6:42 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department has concluded that it should have ended its surveillance of a former Trump campaign adviser earlier than it did because there was “insufficient predication" to continue eavesdropping, according to an order made public Thursday by a secretive intelligence...
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President Donald Trump listens during a roundtable on school choice in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Monday, Dec. 9, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
SKY News
December 10, 2019 - 1:50 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department's internal watchdog released a report Monday that found the FBI had a legitimate reason to open up one of the most politically sensitive investigations ever, the Russia probe that began in secret during President Donald Trump's 2016 campaign that eventually...
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The cover page of the report issued by the Department of Justice inspector general is photographed in Washington, Monday, Dec. 9, 2019. The report on the origins of the Russia probe found no evidence of political bias, despite performance failures. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
SKY News
December 10, 2019 - 1:16 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The FBI was justified in opening its investigation into ties between the Trump presidential campaign and Russia and did not act with political bias, the Justice Department's internal watchdog declared Monday, undercutting President Donald Trump’s repeated claims that he has been...
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FILE - In this Feb. 26, 2019, file photo commuters walk by surveillance cameras installed at a walkway in between two subway stations in Beijing. The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace released a report Tuesday, Sept. 17, that found at least 75 countries are actively using AI tools such as facial recognition for surveillance. The new report says a growing number of countries are following China’s lead in deploying artificial intelligence to track citizens. (AP Photo/Andy Wong, File)
September 17, 2019 - 2:42 pm
A growing number of countries are following China's lead in deploying artificial intelligence to track citizens, according to a research group's report published Tuesday. The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace says at least 75 countries are actively using AI tools such as facial recognition...
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