Government business and finance

August 21, 2018 - 5:58 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — States with a history of fighting air pollution generated by coal-fired power plants on Tuesday criticized a move by President Donald Trump's administration to scale back federal restrictions on emissions, with some threatening court challenges. Illinois Attorney General Lisa...
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In this July 27, 2018 photo, the Dave Johnson coal-fired power plant is silhouetted against the morning sun in Glenrock, Wyo. The Trump administration on Tuesday proposed a major rollback of Obama-era regulations on coal-fired power plants, striking at one of the former administration’s legacy programs to rein in climate-changing fossil-fuel emissions. (AP Photo/J. David Ake)
August 21, 2018 - 5:16 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration on Tuesday moved to prop up the declining coal industry with an overhaul of Obama-era pollution rules, acknowledging that the increased emissions from aging coal-fired plants could kill hundreds more people annually and cost the country billions of dollars...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017, file photo, Kelly Monroe, investigator with the Georgia Secretary of State office, left, takes a look at a new voting machine that produces a paper record being tested at a polling site in Conyers, Ga. States have quickly tapped into $380 million from the federal government to help them shore up their election systems. A report released Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2018, by the U.S. Election Assistance Commission says the largest chunk will be used to improve cybersecurity in 41 states and territories. More than a quarter of the money will go to buy new voting equipment. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
August 21, 2018 - 2:20 pm
ATLANTA (AP) — Racing to shore up their election systems before November, states are using millions of dollars from the federal government to tighten cybersecurity, safeguard their voter registration rolls and improve communication between county and state election officers. The U.S. Election...
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In this photo released by Greek Prime Minister's office, Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras delivers a speech from the western Greek island of Ithaca, legendary home of the ancient mariner Odysseus, hero of Homer's Odyssey epic, on Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2018. Speaking to local officials on the island, Tsipras compared Greece's bailout travails with those of Odysseus. Greece remains shackled to the austerity demands of its former creditors even though it officially entered its post-bailout era Tuesday. (Andrea Bonetti /Greek Prime Minister's Office via AP)
August 21, 2018 - 7:00 am
ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Greece's eight-year bailout ordeal will forever be bookended by two of the country's iconic islands. In choosing the western island of Ithaca to declare the end of the bailout era Tuesday, Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras harked back to one of the country's legendary heroes...
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August 20, 2018 - 8:27 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Trump administration's plan to roll back the centerpiece of Obama-era efforts to slow global warming(all times local): 8:20 p.m. The Trump administration is set to announce plans to roll back the centerpiece of President Barack Obama's efforts to slow global...
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FILE - In this Aug. 1, 2018 file photo, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., joins protesters objecting to President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh at a rally Capitol in Washington. Schumer, who plans to meet Kavanaugh privately early this week, is methodically building arguments that would help vulnerable Democratic senators in Trump-loving states vote “no,” while avoiding explicitly pressuring them. But the party’s restive left-wing says he’s not aggressively rallying Democratic lawmakers to oppose the nomination, inhibiting the momentum needed to galvanize voters and maybe even win the uphill fight. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
August 20, 2018 - 1:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — At least once a week, they assemble in Capitol meeting rooms for an hour-long strategy session. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer convenes the gatherings, which regularly include several Democratic senators, a dozen Senate aides and representatives of about 20 liberal...
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People walk past an electronic board showing Hong Kong share index outside a local bank in Hong Kong, Monday, Aug. 20, 2018. Asian stocks are mostly higher Monday as investors welcomed signs of progress in resolving the trade dispute between the U.S. and China. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
August 20, 2018 - 5:33 am
TOKYO (AP) — Global stocks were mostly higher Monday as investors welcomed signs of progress in resolving the trade dispute between the U.S. and China. The Wall Street Journal reported the countries hope to have a resolution by November. KEEPING SCORE: France's CAC 40 edged up nearly 0.6 percent in...
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FILE- In this April 23, 2018, file photo a car is filled with gasoline at a station in Windham, N.H. Conserving oil is no longer an economic imperative for the U.S., the Trump administration declares in a major new policy statement that threatens to undermine decades of government campaigns for gas-thrifty cars and other conservation programs. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)
August 20, 2018 - 12:13 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Conserving oil is no longer an economic imperative for the U.S., the Trump administration declares in a major new policy statement that threatens to undermine decades of government campaigns for gas-thrifty cars and other conservation programs. The position was outlined in a memo...
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FILE- In this April 24, 2018, file photo replicas of Arturo Di Modica's "Charging Bull" are for sale on a street vendor's table outside the New York Stock Exchange in New York. The U.S. stock market opens at 9:30 a.m. EDT on Friday, Aug 17. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
August 19, 2018 - 11:05 pm
TOKYO (AP) — Asian stocks are mostly higher Monday as investors welcomed signs of progress in resolving the trade dispute between the U.S. and China. The Wall Street Journal reported the countries hope to have a resolution by November. KEEPING SCORE: Japan's benchmark Nikkei 225 inched down 0.3...
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People watch a televised address of Pakistan's newly elected Prime Minister Imran Khan at an electronic shop in Karachi, Pakistan, Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018. Pakistan's newly elected prime minister Imran Khan Sunday said the country was in its worst economic condition and pledged to improve it by adopting austerity to cut government expenditure, introducing progressive taxation, end corruption and bringing back from abroad the plundered public money. (AP Photo/Fareed Khan)
August 19, 2018 - 8:39 pm
ISLAMABAD (AP) — Prime Minister Imran Khan said in his first televised speech in office that Pakistan is in the worst economic condition it has seen and pledged to cut government spending, end corruption and repatriate public funds. A day after he was sworn in, Khan promised reforms across all...
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