Education costs

December 14, 2018 - 10:32 am
The U.S. Education Department says it will start forgiving federal loans for 15,000 former students whose colleges closed before they could graduate. Department officials say the $150 million in loans will automatically be wiped clean, including about $80 million for former students of the defunct...
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FILE - In this Feb. 22, 2018 file photo, Vancouver Whitecaps' Kekuta Manneh, left center, and New York Red Bulls' Aurelien Collin, right center, fight for the ball during a CONCACAF Quarter-final Champions League soccer game in Harrison, N.J. High school junior and soccer player Giovanni Calderon thought he was just going to an interview for a scholarship application. Instead he got a visit from Collin who presented Calderon with a $5,000 college scholarship, tickets to the second leg of the Red Bulls' Eastern Conference final against Atlanta United on Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018, and a trip to the MLS Cup. (AP Photo/Steve Luciano, File)
November 28, 2018 - 3:31 am
High school junior and soccer player Giovanni Calderon thought he was just going to an interview for a scholarship application. Instead he got a visit from New York Red Bulls defender Aurelien Collin. Collin presented Calderon with a $5,000 college scholarship, tickets to the second leg of the Red...
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FILE- This April 2, 2014, file photo, shows the headquarters of student loan debt collector Navient Corporation, in Wilmington, Del. One of the nation’s largest student loan servicing companies may have driven tens of thousands of borrowers struggling with their debts into high-cost repayment plans. That’s the finding of a Department of Education audit of practices at Navient Corp., the nation’s third-largest student loan servicing company. (William Bretzger/The News Journal via AP, File)
November 20, 2018 - 5:57 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — One of the nation's largest student loan servicing companies may have driven tens of thousands of borrowers struggling with their debts into higher-cost repayment plans. That's the finding of a Department of Education audit of practices at Navient Corp., the nation's third-largest...
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This September 2018 photo provided by Louis-Henri Merino shows Alaleh Azhir in Los Angeles. Azhir, a 21-year old senior at Johns Hopkins University in Maryland, is among the latest crop of American Rhodes scholars, which has more women than any other single class. The New York City resident who emigrated from Iran when she was 14 years old, hopes to eventually become a doctor and will be studying women's and reproductive health at Oxford. (Louis-Henri Merino via AP)
November 18, 2018 - 4:35 pm
BOSTON (AP) — The latest crop of U.S. Rhodes scholars has more women than any other single class, and almost half of this year's recipients of the prestigious scholarship to Oxford University in England are either immigrants or first-generation Americans, the Rhodes Trust announced Sunday. Among...
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This September 2018 photo provided by Nerdwallet, Urban Adams and his daughter pose for a photo in Canton, N.Y. Sofie considered several schools before taking an academic scholarship and an offer to play this fall for St. Lawrence University, a 2,500-student private college in upstate New York with a study abroad program. (Urban Adams/NerdWallet via AP)
November 15, 2018 - 10:06 am
A four-year journey to decide where to go to college ended for Sofie Adams when a college recruiter approached her after a softball game and asked, "Do you want to study abroad?" "No one else had asked me that, and yes — I really do want to get overseas," says Adams, 18, who considered several...
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In this Sept. 17, 2018 photo, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos speaks during a student town hall at National Constitution Center in Philadelphia. A federal court has denied a request to delay an Obama-era regulation that helps students defrauded by for-profit colleges get their student loans forgiven. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
October 16, 2018 - 1:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal court has denied a request to further delay an Obama-era regulation that helps students defrauded by for-profit colleges get their student loans forgiven. Julie Murray, an attorney with Public Citizen who represents defrauded students, says the policy that has been...
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October 12, 2018 - 5:43 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Education Department says it will no longer try to delay an Obama-era regulation that helped students defrauded by for-profit colleges get their loans forgiven. A federal court ruled last month that Education Secretary Betsy DeVos' decision to delay the regulation, known as...
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In this October 2014 photo provided by Nerdwallet, Takiia Anderson, left, poses for a photo with her daughter Taje Perkins during a campus visit to Anderson’s alma mater, Howard University in Washington. Today, Anderson’s student debt is long gone. She has nearly $500,000 in retirement savings, and her daughter, Taje Perkins, finished her third year at Spelman College in Atlanta with no student loans to cover its nearly $30,000 per year in tuition and fees. (Nerdwallet via AP)
October 11, 2018 - 10:37 am
When Takiia Anderson graduated from Boston College Law School in 1999, she was a single mom with a 2-year-old child, nearly $100,000 in student loans and a new job as a government attorney that paid $34,102 a year. She didn't like that math. "People are talking about 20 years to pay off a student...
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FILE - In this May 22, 2018, file photo, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos testifies at a House Committee on Education and the Workforce on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Education Department says it'll miss a key deadline in its push to ease regulations for for-profit colleges. A rule being drafted by DeVos is meant to lower protections for students swindled by their schools. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
October 03, 2018 - 5:34 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Students defrauded by for-profit colleges will get a reprieve from the Education Department's push to ease regulations for those schools because the government said it would miss a deadline for releasing an updated rule on loan forgiveness. The department had been set to issue the...
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In this Dec. 5, 2012 photo, H. Gilbert Welch is photographed at his Dartmouth College office in Lebanon, N.H. Welch, a prominent health policy expert at Dartmouth College, has resigned after being accused of plagiarizing the work of other professors for a paper published in a prestigious journal. The Valley News reports that Welch announced Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018, that he would resign. (Ryan Dorgan/The Valley News via AP)
September 14, 2018 - 6:35 pm
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — A prominent health policy expert at Dartmouth College resigned after being accused of plagiarizing the work of other professors for a paper published in a prestigious journal. H. Gilbert Welch sent an email to colleagues Thursday saying he was saddened to resign. He maintained...
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