Earth science

Junar Lim takes photos of Ziah Lim, left, and Arsenia Lim, all of Cavite, the Philippines, at gardens in Town Square in Anchorage, Alaska, Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019. Alaska recorded its warmest month ever in July and hot, dry weather has continued in Anchorage and much of the region south of the Alaska Range. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
August 17, 2019 - 11:57 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska has been America's canary in the coal mine for climate warming, and the yellow bird is swooning. July was Alaska's warmest month ever, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Sea ice melted. Bering Sea fish swam in above-normal temperatures...
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Junar Lim takes photos of Ziah Lim, left, and Arsenia Lim, all of Cavite, the Philippines, at gardens in Town Square in Anchorage, Alaska, Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019. Alaska recorded its warmest month ever in July and hot, dry weather has continued in Anchorage and much of the region south of the Alaska Range. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
August 17, 2019 - 11:49 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska has been America's canary in the coal mine for climate warming, and the yellow bird is swooning. July was Alaska's warmest month ever, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Sea ice melted. Bering Sea fish swam in above-normal temperatures...
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In this Thursday, Aug. 1, 2019, photo, evidence of a Cascadia earthquake's awesome destructive power is visible at the beach in Neskowin, Ore. A "ghost forest" of Sitka spruces juts up from the beach in the tiny town. The trees were likely buried by tsunami debris 2,000 years earlier, and partially uncovered by storms in 1997. (AP Photo/Andrew Selsky)
August 16, 2019 - 9:30 am
NEWPORT, Ore. (AP) — With sunlight sparkling off surrounding Yaquina Bay, workers are putting up an ocean-studies building, smack in the middle of an area expected to one day be hit by a tsunami. Experts say it's only a matter of time before a shift in a major fault line off the Oregon coast causes...
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In this photo taken on Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2019, icebergs are photographed from the window of an airplane carrying NASA Scientists as they fly on a mission to track melting ice in eastern Greenland. Greenland has been melting faster in the last decade and this summer, it has seen two of the biggest melts on record since 2012. (AP Photo/Mstyslav Chernov)
August 15, 2019 - 3:55 pm
ABOARD A NASA RESEARCH PLANE OVER GREENLAND (AP) — The fields of rippling ice 500 feet below the NASA plane give way to the blue-green of water dotted with irregular chunks of bleached-white ice, some the size of battleships, some as tall as 15-story buildings. Like nearly every other glacier on...
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FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2011 file photo visitors view the dramatic bend in the Colorado River at the popular Horseshoe Bend in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, in Page, Ariz. Some 40 million people in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming draw from the Colorado River and its tributaries. Much of that originates as snow. A wet winter likely will fend off mandated water shortages for states in the U.S. West that rely on the river but won't erase the impact of climate change. Climate change means the region is still getting drier and hotter. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
August 15, 2019 - 9:42 am
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Snow swamped mountains across the U.S. West last winter, leaving enough to thrill skiers into the summer, swelling rivers and streams when it melted, and largely making wildfire restrictions unnecessary. But the wet weather can be misleading. Climate change means the region...
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This undated photo provided by the 'Helmholtz centre for polar and marine research the Alfred Wegener institute' shows snow samples from Tschuggen, Switzerland, locked and ready for transport to Davos. Scientists of the institute say they proved plastic in the snow of the Alps and the Arctic. (Juerg Trachsel/WSL-Institut für Schnee- und Lawinenforschung SLF via AP)
August 14, 2019 - 2:44 pm
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say they've found an abundance of tiny plastic particles in Arctic snow, indicating that so-called microplastics are being sucked into the atmosphere and carried long distances to some of the remotest corners of the planet. The researchers examined snow collected from sites...
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Greta Thunberg poses for a picture in the Marina where the boat Malizia is moored in Plymouth, England Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2019. Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old climate change activist who has inspired student protests around the world, is heading to the United States this week - in a sailboat. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
August 13, 2019 - 12:14 pm
PLYMOUTH, England (AP) — Greta Thunberg's two-week voyage to the United States will be no pleasure cruise. The 16-year-old climate change activist who has inspired student protests around the world will leave Plymouth, England, later this week bound for New York in a high-tech but decidedly low-...
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Kai Frazier and Chance Seawright, brothers visiting from Aiken, South Carolina, cool off while playing in the Fountain of Rings in Centennial Olympic Park, Monday, Aug. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Andrea Smith)
August 12, 2019 - 7:23 pm
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Forecasters are warning about days of scorching, dangerous heat gripping a wide swath of the U.S. South and Midwest, where the heat index on Monday was approaching 120 degrees (48.9 Celsius) in one town and climbed nearly that high in others. With temperatures around 100...
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FILE - In this July 25, 2019, file photo, the sun sets in Cuggiono near Milan, Italy. A new U.N. report on warming and land use says climate change is hitting us where it counts: the stomach. The scientific report on Thursday, Aug. 8, finds that as the world warms it degrades the land more. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno, File)
August 08, 2019 - 9:14 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on a new United Nations report on climate change (all times local): 3:10 p.m. A manager in the U.N. Climate Change secretariat who helped write a new report on the subject, said the grueling work by the volunteer authors was "like a dentist's appointment for six days"...
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FILE - This Monday, July 30, 2018 file photo shows rows of soybean plants in a field near Bennington, Neb. A report by the United Nations released on Thursday, Aug. 8, 2019 says that human-caused climate change is dramatically degrading the planet’s land, while the way people use the Earth is making global warming worse. The vicious cycle is already making food more expensive, scarcer and even less nutritious, as well as cutting the number of species on Earth, according to a special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
August 08, 2019 - 4:07 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — On the ground, climate change is hitting us where it counts: the stomach — not to mention the forests, plants and animals. A new United Nations scientific report examines how global warming and land interact in a vicious cycle. Human-caused climate change is dramatically degrading...
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