Civil rights violations

March 19, 2019 - 10:58 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A man who spent more than six years in prison after police framed him for murder is expected to receive a $13.1 million settlement from city of San Francisco on Tuesday. The Board of Supervisors scheduled a vote to approve the payment to settle a civil rights lawsuit filed by...
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California Attorney General Xavier Becerra discusses the decision that his office will not file charges against the two Sacramento Police officers in last years fatal shooting of Stephon Clark, during a news conference, Tuesday, March 5, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
March 05, 2019 - 10:09 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California's attorney general announced Tuesday that he won't charge two Sacramento police officers who fatally shot an unarmed black man last year, joining a local prosecutor in finding that the officers reasonably believed Stephon Clark had a gun as he moved toward them...
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California Attorney General Xavier Becerra leaves leaves the Calvary Christian Center after meeting with SeQuette Clark, Tuesday, March 5, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif. Becerra is expected later today to announce the results of his criminal investigation into the shooting death of Clark's son, Stephon Clark, by Sacramento police officers last year. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
March 05, 2019 - 5:35 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The Latest on the California attorney general's decision on whether to charge officers who killed an unarmed black man last year (all times local): 2:30 p.m. Federal authorities are opening their own investigation into Sacramento police officers' fatal shooting last year...
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Houston Police Department Chief Art Acevedo holds up a letter from the FBI announcing the bureau's civil rights investigation related to the deaths of two people during the no-knock raid by narcotics officers that killed two people and injured five police officers last month, during a press conference from Houston City Hall, Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2019.
February 20, 2019 - 8:31 pm
HOUSTON (AP) — Prosecutors will review more than 1,400 criminal cases that involved a Houston officer who the police chief has accused of lying in an affidavit justifying a drug raid on a home in which officers shot and killed two residents, authorities said Wednesday. The FBI also announced that...
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FILE - In this Jan. 30, 2017, file photo, attorney Gadeir Abbas speaks during a news conference at the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) in Washington. The federal government has acknowledged that it shares its terrorist watchlist with more than 1,400 private entities, including hospitals and universities, prompting concerns from civil libertarians that those mistakenly placed on the list could face a wide variety of hassles in their daily lives. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
February 20, 2019 - 6:21 pm
FALLS CHURCH, Va. (AP) — A Muslim civil rights group called for a congressional investigation Wednesday after its lawsuit revealed that the U.S. government has shared its terrorist watchlist with more than 1,400 private entities, including hospitals and universities. The Council on American-Islamic...
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FILE - In this Dec. 3, 2018, file photo, migrants are escorted by a U.S. Border Patrol agent as they are detained after climbing over the border wall from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, to San Ysidro, Calif. Civil liberties groups have filed a lawsuit in federal court in San Francisco to block the Trump administration from returning asylum seekers to Mexico while their cases wind through U.S. immigration courts. The American Civil Liberties Union and other groups said in the suit filed Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019, that the policy puts asylum seekers in danger and violates U.S. immigration law. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell, File)
February 14, 2019 - 9:07 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The Trump administration's policy of returning asylum seekers to Mexico while their cases wind through immigration courts violates U.S. law by putting the migrants in danger and depriving them of the ability to prepare their cases, a lawsuit filed Thursday by civil liberties...
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In this Jan. 28, 2019, photo, Kenji Aiba, left, and his partner Ken Kozumi laugh during an interview with The Associated Press in Tokyo. Kozumi and Aiba have held onto a marriage certificate they signed at their wedding party in 2013, anticipating that Japan would emulate other advanced nations and legalize same-sex unions. That day has yet to come, and legally they are just friends even though they've lived as a married couple for more than five years. On Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019, Valentine’s Day, the couple is joining a dozen other same-sex couples in Japan’s first lawsuits challenging the constitutionality of the country’s rejection of same-sex marriage. (AP Photo/Toru Takahashi)
February 14, 2019 - 3:06 am
TOKYO (AP) — Thirteen gay couples filed Japan's first lawsuit challenging the country's rejection of same-sex marriage Thursday, arguing the denial violates their constitutional right to equality. Six couples holding banners saying "Marriage For All Japan" walked into Tokyo District Court to file...
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FILE - In this June 2, 2016 file photo, Heidi Lilley stands for a portrait near the spot where she was arrested by the Laconia, N.H. police. On Friday, Feb. 8, 2019, New Hampshire's highest court has upheld the conviction of three women arrested for going topless on a New Hampshire beach. In a 3-2 ruling, the court found Laconia's ordinance does not discriminate on the basis of gender or violate the women's right to free speech. (Geoff Forester/The Concord Monitor via AP)
February 08, 2019 - 6:38 pm
New Hampshire's highest court upheld Friday the conviction of three women who were arrested for going topless on a beach, finding their constitutional rights were not violated. In a 3-2 ruling, the court decided that Laconia's ordinance does not discriminate on the basis of gender or violate the...
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FILE - In this Friday, Nov. 16, 2018, file photo, Broward County Supervisor of Elections Brenda Snipes speaks to members of the media after a hand recount, in Lauderhill, Fla. A Florida federal judge ruled Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019, that former governor and current U.S. Sen. Rick Scott violated Snipe's constitutional rights when he suspended and "vilified" her without first allowing her to make her own case. Snipes came under fire during the contentious recount that followed the 2018 elections. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)
January 10, 2019 - 12:07 am
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Former Gov. and current U.S. Sen. Rick Scott violated a former state election official's constitutional rights when he suspended and "vilified" her without first allowing her to make her own case, a Florida federal judge ruled Wednesday. U.S. District Judge Mark Walker said...
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January 09, 2019 - 5:53 pm
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — A federal judge on Wednesday struck down an Iowa law that made it illegal to get a job at a livestock farm to conduct an animal cruelty undercover investigation, finding the law violated the constitutional right to free speech. U.S. District Court Judge James Gritzner sided...
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