Civil rights violations

A briefcase of a census taker is seen as she knocks on the door of a residence Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2020, in Winter Park, Fla. A half-million census takers head out en mass this week to knock on the doors of households that haven't yet responded to the 2020 census. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
SKY News
October 13, 2020 - 10:11 pm
The Supreme Court on Tuesday ruled that the Trump administration can end census field operations early, in a blow to efforts to make sure minorities are properly counted in the crucial once-a-decade tally. The decision was not a total loss for plaintiffs in a lawsuit challenging the administration’...
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Rep. Mike Johnson, R-La., speaks during a House Judiciary Committee markup of the Justice in Policing Act of 2020 on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, June 17, 2020. (Sarah Silbiger/Pool via AP)
SKY News
June 18, 2020 - 12:04 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — As Americans protest racial inequality and the death of George Floyd and others at the hands of police, their pleas are being heard in the chambers of the U.S. Capitol. Both Democrats and Republicans have introduced legislation to reform policing in America, but they diverge on...
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Ammunition at gun show
Getty Images
SKY News
April 23, 2020 - 7:35 pm
A federal judge on Thursday blocked a California law requiring background checks for people buying ammunition, issuing a sharply worded rebuke of “onerous and convoluted” regulations that violate the constitutional right to bear arms. U.S. District Judge Roger Benitez of San Diego ruled in favor of...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018, file photo, students hold their hands in the air as they are evacuated by police from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., after a shooter opened fire on the campus. A Florida law that allows judges to bar anyone deemed dangerous from possessing firearms has been used 3,500 times since its enactment after the 2018 high school massacre. An Associated Press analysis shows the law is being used unevenly around the state. (Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP, File)
SKY News
February 14, 2020 - 11:49 am
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — A 23-year-old man who posted on Facebook, “I don't know why I don't go on a killing spree." A West Palm Beach couple who shot up their home while high on cocaine. A 31-year-old Gulf Coast man who pointed a semiautomatic rifle at a motorcyclist. All four Florida...
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The Virginia state Capitol building is surrounded by fencing, Thursday, Jan. 16, 2020 in Richmond, Va., in preparation for Monday's rally by gun rights advocates. Gun-rights groups are asking a judge to block the Virginia governor's ban on firearms at a massive pro-gun rally scheduled for next week. Gov. Ralph Northam on Wednesday, Jan. 15, announced a state of emergency and banned all weapons from the rally at the Capitol. (Dean Hoffmeyer/Richmond Times-Dispatch via AP)
SKY News
January 17, 2020 - 7:48 pm
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Virginia's highest court on Friday upheld a ban on firearms at an upcoming pro-gun rally in the state's capital, an event that authorities feared could erupt in violence at the hands of armed extremists. The Virginia Supreme Court's decision came a day after gun-rights groups...
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In this Nov. 14, 2018 photo, East Hampton, Conn., Police Chief Dennis Woessner addresses the Town Council in East Hampton. Chief Woessner has concluded that an officer's membership in a far-right group infamous for engaging in violent clashes at political rallies didn't violate any department policies. Woessner said that officer Kevin P. Wilcox is no longer associated with the Proud Boys group. (Jeff Mill/The Middletown Press via AP)
October 15, 2019 - 6:43 pm
A Connecticut police officer's membership in the Proud Boys, a far-right group known for engaging in violent clashes at political rallies, didn't violate department policies, the town's police chief has concluded in response to a civil rights group's concerns. The East Hampton officer, Kevin P...
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FILE - In this Oct. 2, 2019 file photo, an abortion opponent sings to herself outside the Jackson Womens Health Organization clinic in Jackson, Miss. Three judges from a conservative federal appeals court are hearing arguments, Monday, Oct. 7, over a Mississippi law that would ban most abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy. Republican Gov. Phil Bryant signed the law in 2018, the state’s only abortion clinic immediately sued and U.S. District Judge Carlton Reeves blocked the law from taking effect. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
October 07, 2019 - 3:45 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A federal court that rejected Mississippi's 15-week abortion ban should have let the state present evidence about whether a fetus experiences pain, an attorney for the state argued Monday. But a lawyer for Mississippi's only abortion clinic said the Supreme Court has been clear...
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Former Honolulu police officer Reginald Ramones, center, walks down a street in Honolulu on Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019. Ramones has pleaded guilty to failing to report that another police officer forced a homeless man to lick a public urinal. (AP Photo/Jennifer Sinco Kelleher)
September 25, 2019 - 11:09 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — A Honolulu homeless man fearing he would be arrested, reluctantly obeyed a police officer's orders to lick a urinal, according to a court document made public Wednesday after a former officer pleaded guilty to failing to report the incident. And it wasn't the first time. Officer...
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FILE - In this Friday, Oct. 17, 2014 file photo, Ignacio Lanuza-Torres holds his son, Isaiah, 4, during a portrait session in Seattle. Lanuza-Torres, a Mexican immigrant who was nearly deported after a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement lawyer forged a key document in his case, accomplished a fair amount by suing over the misconduct. The lawsuit helped prompt a criminal investigation that sent the lawyer to jail, established legal precedent concerning constitutional rights during immigration proceedings, and resulted in a small settlement from the lawyer. But the case failed in its effort to hold the federal government liable for its lawyer's actions, and now the Justice Department is trying to squeeze him and his attorneys for legal fees and costs that will likely top $100,000.(AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
September 12, 2019 - 6:54 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A Mexican immigrant who was nearly deported after a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement lawyer forged a document in his case brought about change by suing over the misconduct. Ignacio Lanuza's lawsuit helped prompt a criminal investigation that sent the lawyer to jail,...
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September 12, 2019 - 6:48 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A New York City law banning so-called gay conversion therapy would be repealed under legislation introduced Thursday over concerns that a pending federal lawsuit could lead to a decision unfavorable to the LGBTQ community if the case were to make it to the Supreme Court. Council...
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