Biochemistry

In this Wednesday, April 8, 2020 photo provided by the Center for Pharmaceutical Research, a participant in a COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine trial receives an injection in Kansas City, Mo. This early safety study, called a Phase 1 trial, is using a vaccine candidate developed by Inovio Pharmaceuticals. (Center for Pharmaceutical Research via AP)
SKY News
April 08, 2020 - 5:07 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. researchers have opened another safety test of an experimental COVID-19 vaccine, this one using a skin-deep shot instead of the usual deeper jab. The pinch should feel like a simple skin test, a researcher told the volunteer lying on an exam table in Kansas City, Missouri, on...
Read More
Visitors to the Oklahoma City National Memorial walk around the "Survivor Tree," a 100-year-old American elm and symbol of hope after the deadly 1995 bombing, Friday, April 19, 2019, in Oklahoma City. Science and technology are helping Oklahoma City to sustain the DNA of the tree symbolizing hope 24 years after the deadliest act of domestic terrorism on U.S. soil. As part of an annual remembrance of the bombing, civic leaders on Friday plan to transplant a tree that was cloned from the scarred American elm that lived through the blast. They hope the younger elm will replace the "Survivor Tree" once it dies. (AP Photo/Adam Kealoha Causey)
April 19, 2019 - 6:08 pm
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Science and technology are helping Oklahoma City to sustain the DNA — and the spirit — of a tree that has symbolized hope in the 24 years since the deadliest act of domestic terrorism in U.S. history shook the city to its core. As part of an annual remembrance of the bombing,...
Read More
A scientist at the NY Genome Center in New York demonstrates equipment used in single-cell RNA analysis on Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018. Until recently, trying to study key traits of cells from people and other animals often meant analyzing bulk samples of tissue, producing an average of results from many cell types. But scientists have developed techniques that let them directly study the DNA codes, and its chemical cousin RNA, the activity of genes and other traits of individual cells. (AP Photo/Malcolm Ritter)
March 04, 2019 - 6:29 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Did you hear what happened when Bill Gates walked into a bar? Everybody there immediately became millionaires — on average. That joke about a very rich man is an old one among statisticians. So why did Peter Smibert use it to explain a revolution in biology? Because it shows...
Read More
In this Nov. 28, 2018, photo, He Jiankui, a Chinese researcher, speaks during the Human Genome Editing Conference in Hong Kong. He made his first public comments about his claim to have helped make the world's first gene-edited babies. The uproar over the unproven report of gene-edited births in China has researchers elsewhere worried about a backlash. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
November 30, 2018 - 1:53 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists working on the frontiers of medicine fear the uproar over the reported births of gene-edited babies in China could jeopardize promising research into how to alter heredity to fend off a variety of disorders. Researchers are rapidly learning how to edit DNA to fight such...
Read More
He Jiankui, a Chinese researcher, center, speaks during the Human Genome Editing Conference in Hong Kong, Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2018. He made his first public comments about his claim to have helped make the world's first gene-edited babies. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
November 29, 2018 - 7:09 am
HONG KONG (AP) — The Latest on a Chinese scientist's claim to have made the world's first gene-edited babies (all times local): 7:30 p.m. China's government has ordered a halt to work by a medical team that claimed to have helped make the world's first gene-edited babies. Vice Minister of Science...
Read More
In this Oct. 10, 2018 photo, He Jiankui is reflected in a glass panel as he works at a computer at a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Chinese scientist He claims he helped make world's first genetically edited babies: twin girls whose DNA he said he altered. He revealed it Monday, Nov. 26, in Hong Kong to one of the organizers of an international conference on gene editing. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
November 27, 2018 - 2:19 pm
SHENZHEN, China (AP) — The Chinese scientist who says he helped make the world's first gene-edited babies veered off a traditional career path, keeping much of his research secret in pursuit of a larger goal — making history. He Jiankui's outsized aspirations began to take shape in 2016, the year...
Read More
In this Oct. 10, 2018 photo, He Jiankui speaks during an interview at a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Chinese scientist He claims he helped make world's first genetically edited babies: twin girls whose DNA he said he altered. He revealed it Monday, Nov. 26, in Hong Kong to one of the organizers of an international conference on gene editing. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
November 26, 2018 - 1:58 pm
HONG KONG (AP) — Scientists and bioethics experts reacted with shock, anger and alarm Monday to a Chinese researcher's claim that he helped make the world's first genetically edited babies. He Jiankui of Southern University of Science and Technology of China said he altered the DNA of twin girls...
Read More
In this Oct. 10, 2018 photo, He Jiankui is reflected in a glass panel as he works at a computer at a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Chinese scientist He claims he helped make world's first genetically edited babies: twin girls whose DNA he said he altered. He revealed it Monday, Nov. 26, in Hong Kong to one of the organizers of an international conference on gene editing. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
November 26, 2018 - 1:36 am
HONG KONG (AP) — A Chinese researcher claims that he helped make the world's first genetically edited babies — twin girls born this month whose DNA he said he altered with a powerful new tool capable of rewriting the very blueprint of life. If true, it would be a profound leap of science and ethics...
Read More
A search and rescue workers searches a car for human remains at a trailer park burned out from the Camp Fire, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018, in Paradise, Calif. (AP Photo/John Locher)
November 13, 2018 - 7:07 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Authorities doing the somber work of identifying the victims of California's deadliest wildfire are drawing on leading-edge DNA technology, but older scientific techniques and deduction could also come into play, experts say. With the death toll from the Northern California blaze...
Read More
FILE - In this Friday, April 27, 2018 file photo, Joseph James DeAngelo, 72, who authorities suspect is the "Golden State Killer" responsible for at least a dozen murders and 50 rapes in the 1970s and 80s, is accompanied by Sacramento County Public Defender Diane Howard, right, during his arraignment in Sacramento County Superior Court in Sacramento, Calif. Authorities said they used a genetic genealogy website to connect some crime-scene DNA to DeAngelo. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
October 11, 2018 - 2:01 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A new study estimates that about 60 percent of the U.S. population with European heritage may be identifiable from their DNA by searching consumer websites, even if they've never made their own genetic information available. That number is expected to grow as more and more people...
Read More

Pages