Astronomy

This Oct. 12, 2019 photo made available by NASA shows the comet 2I/Borisov, seen by the Hubble Space Telescope. It’s the second known interstellar visitor to swoop through our backyard. An amateur astronomer from Crimea, Gennady Borisov, discovered the comet in August, two years after the first alien guest, a cigar-shaped rock, popped up. (NASA, ESA, D. Jewitt (UCLA) via AP)
October 16, 2019 - 2:15 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The Hubble Space Telescope has captured the best pictures yet of our newest interstellar visitor. This comet from outside our solar system is zooming by us at a blistering 110,000 mph (177,000 kph). Hubble caught some glam shots over the weekend from a distance of 260...
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FILE -- In this Feb. 12, 2017 photo Polish author Olga Tokarczuk spekas during a press conference in Berlin, Germany. Olga Tokarczuk is named recipient of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Literature, Thursday Oct. 10, 2019. Two Nobel Prizes in literature are announced Thursday after the 2018 literature award was postponed following sex abuse allegations that rocked the Swedish Academy at that time. (Britta Pedersen/dpa via AP)
October 10, 2019 - 9:44 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — Polish novelist Olga Tokarczuk and Austrian author Peter Handke — two writers whose works are deeply intertwined in Europe's religious, ethnic and social fault lines — won the 2018 and 2019 Nobel Prizes for literature on Thursday. The rare double announcement came after no...
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Winner of Nobel Prize of Chemistry Akira Yoshino smiles during a press conference in Tokyo, Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2019. Yoshino is one of three scientists to have won this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their contributions to lithium-ion batteries, which have reshaped energy storage and transformed cars, mobile phones and many other devices in an increasingly portable and electronic world. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)
October 09, 2019 - 7:58 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — Three scientists won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for their work developing lithium-ion batteries, which have reshaped energy storage and transformed cars, mobile phones and many other devices — and reduced the world's reliance on fossil fuels that contribute to global...
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This combination of Oct. 8, 2019, photos shows the Nobel Prize winners in Physics, from left, James Peebles in Princeton, N.J., Didier Queloz in London and Michel Mayor in Madrid. Peebles, an emeritus professor at Princeton University, won for his theoretical discoveries in cosmology. Swiss star-gazers Mayor, and Queloz, both of the University of Geneva, were honored for finding an exoplanet — a planet outside our solar system — that orbits a sun-like star, the Nobel committee said. (AP Photo)
October 08, 2019 - 1:12 pm
STOCKHOLM (AP) — A Canadian American cosmologist and two Swiss scientists won this year's Nobel Prize in Physics on Tuesday for exploring the evolution of the universe and discovering a new kind of planet, with implications for that nagging question: Does life exist only on Earth? Canadian-born...
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Ulf Danielsson, member of the Nobel committee talks during the announcement of the winners of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics during news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on Tuesday Oct. 8, 2019. The 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics is awarded to James Peebles, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz. (Claudio Bresciani / TT via AP)
October 08, 2019 - 9:03 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — The Latest on the Nobel Prize in Physics (all times local): 2:30 p.m. A University of Cambridge astronomer says the work that earned three scientists the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics "highlights astronomy as the grandest of the environmental sciences." Emeritus Professor Martin Rees...
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FILE - This July 23, 2008 file image made available by NASA shows the planet Saturn, as seen from the Cassini spacecraft. Twenty new moons have been found around Saturn, giving the ringed planet a total of 82, scientists said Monday, Oct. 7, 2019. (NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute via AP, File)
October 07, 2019 - 5:27 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The solar system has a new winner in the moon department. Twenty new moons have been found around Saturn, giving the ringed planet a total of 82, scientists said Monday. That beats Jupiter and its 79 moons. "It was fun to find that Saturn is the true moon king," said...
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In this photo provided by the Museum of the Bible, a photo of the Lunar Bible on display at the museum is pictured in an undated photo. The Museum of the Bible in Washington has quietly replaced an artifact purported to be one of a handful of miniature Bibles that a NASA astronaut carried to the moon in 1971 after an expert questioned its authenticity. (Museum of the Bible Collection via AP)
October 05, 2019 - 10:14 am
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Museum of the Bible in Washington quietly replaced an artifact purported to be one of a handful of miniature Bibles that a NASA astronaut carried to the moon in 1971 after an expert questioned its authenticity. The move follows an announcement last year that at least five...
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October 03, 2019 - 5:14 am
TOKYO (AP) — Japan’s space agency says its Hayabusa2 spacecraft has released a small rover that will land on the surface of an asteroid as part its final mission before heading back to Earth. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, or JAXA, said the Minerva-II2 rover began its slow descent to the...
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September 28, 2019 - 10:29 pm
BOCA CHICA VILLAGE, Texas (AP) — Elon Musk has unveiled a SpaceX spacecraft designed to carry a crew and cargo to the moon, Mars or anywhere else in the solar system and land back on Earth perpendicularly. In a livestreamed speech from SpaceX's launch facility near the southern tip of Texas, Musk...
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NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine attends a press conference at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) headquarters in Tokyo Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019. Bridenstine said space security is necessary so that the United States, Japan and other allies can safely explore the moon and Mars explorations. Bridenstine said NASA said that gadgets using the space technology have become indispensable part of the people’s lives and its safety must be preserved. (AP Photo/Mari Yamaguchi)
September 25, 2019 - 2:24 am
TOKYO (AP) — The head of NASA said Wednesday that space security is necessary so that the United States, Japan and others can safely explore the moon and Mars. NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine also said during his Tokyo visit that he wants to take the U.S. space partnership with Japan to a new...
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