American Civil War

FILE - In this Jan. 30, 1974, file photo Vice President Gerald Ford and House Speaker Carl Albert listen to President Richard Nixon deliver his State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress in Washington. President Donald Trump will deliver his State of the Union address at one of the most contentious times in his stewardship of the nation, but others may have had it worse: Abraham Lincoln had the Civil War, Nixon was caught up in Watergate and Bill Clinton was impeached. (AP Photo)
February 02, 2019 - 6:02 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is the latest chief executive to deliver a State of the Union address at a time of turmoil. But others may have had it even worse. Abraham Lincoln delivered a written report during the Civil War, Richard Nixon spoke while embroiled in the Watergate scandal...
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February 02, 2019 - 5:07 pm
PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — Historian Henry Louis Gates can trace the roots of his upcoming PBS documentary about the Reconstruction to his days in school, when he'd hear about the end of slavery during the Civil War, then virtually nothing about race relations until the civil rights movement in the...
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Gov. Greg Abbott arrives to address the House members during the first day of the 86th Texas Legislative session, Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
January 11, 2019 - 1:58 pm
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas Gov. Greg Abbott agreed Friday to remove a plaque in the state Capitol that rejects slavery as the underlying cause of the Civil War, bending after years of resistance by state Republican leaders in the face of Confederate monuments falling nationwide. A unanimous vote by...
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This July 6, 2017 photo shows a makeshift memorial to Hispanic Civil War Union soldiers who fought in the Battle of Glorieta Pass in Northern New Mexico outside Santa Fe. It's a typical representation for many sites linked to U.S. Latino history: It's shabby, largely unknown and always at risk of disappearing if it weren't for a handful of history aficionados. The lack of historical markers and preserved historical sites connected to Latino civil rights worries scholars who feel the scarcity is affecting how Americans see Hispanics in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras)
October 14, 2018 - 11:44 am
GLORIETA PASS, N.M. (AP) — A makeshift memorial to Hispanic Civil War Union soldiers in an isolated part northern New Mexico is a typical representation of sites linked to U.S. Latino history: It's shabby, largely unknown and at risk of disappearing. Across the U.S, many sites historically...
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The 3rd Infantry Regiment, also known as the Old Guard, casket teams carry the remains of two unknown Civil War Union soldiers to their grave at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. The soldiers were discovered at Manassas National Battlefield and will be buried in Section 81. Arlington National Cemetery opened the new section of gravesites with the burial. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
September 06, 2018 - 6:01 pm
ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) — Arlington National Cemetery returned to its roots as a resting place for the Civil War dead with a burial Thursday of two unknown Union soldiers. The burials marked the dedication of an $87 million expansion of the cemetery that officials hope will extend the cemetery's life...
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FILE - This Sept. 19, 2017, file photo, shows a Confederate monument honoring Henry Lawson Wyatt at the state Capitol in Raleigh, N.C. A North Carolina historical commission decided Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018, that this Confederate monument and two others should remain on the state Capitol grounds with newly added context about slavery, weighing in less than two days after another rebel statue was torn down by protesters at the state’s flagship university. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)
August 23, 2018 - 12:21 am
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Three Confederate monuments on the North Carolina Capitol grounds will feature signs with historical context about slavery and civil rights, following a decision by a state historical panel that said a monument honoring African-Americans also should be added The state...
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FILE - This Sept. 19, 2017, file photo, shows a Confederate monument honoring Henry Lawson Wyatt at the state Capitol in Raleigh, N.C. A North Carolina historical commission decided Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018, that this Confederate monument and two others should remain on the state Capitol grounds with newly added context about slavery, weighing in less than two days after another rebel statue was torn down by protesters at the state’s flagship university. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)
August 22, 2018 - 6:39 pm
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Three Confederate monuments will remain on the North Carolina Capitol grounds, but with newly added context about slavery and civil rights. That's the decision from a state historical panel, two days after protesters tore down another rebel statue at the state's flagship...
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A Confederate monument dedicated in 1909 stands in the middle of the square in Tuskegee, Ala., on Thursday, June 28, 2018. Demonstrators once tried to topple the monument and it has been the target of vandals. Yet a Confederate heritage group owns the land, and the memorial has survived generations in a mostly black city known as a landmark of minority education and empowerment. Black graffiti from a vandalism incident that occurred last year is still visible on the base. (AP Photo/Jay Reeves)
August 09, 2018 - 3:21 pm
TUSKEGEE, Ala. (AP) — In 1906, when aging, white Confederate veterans of the Civil War and black ex-slaves still lived on the old plantations of the Deep South, two very different celebrations were afoot in this city known even then as a beacon of black empowerment. Tuskegee Institute, founded to...
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In this Monday, Aug. 6, 2018 photo, a No Trespassing sign is displayed in front of a statue of Robert E. Lee in Charlottesville, Va., at the park that was the focus of the Unite the Right rally. Pressure to take down America’s monuments honoring slain Confederate soldiers and the generals who led them didn’t start with Charlottesville. But the deadly violence that rocked the Virginia college town a year ago gave the issue an explosive momentum. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
August 08, 2018 - 1:56 pm
Pressure to take down America's monuments honoring slain Confederate soldiers and the generals who led them didn't start with Charlottesville. But the deadly violence that rocked the Virginia college town a year ago gave the issue an explosive momentum. Confederate monuments at public parks, county...
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